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Veggie-full Soba Noodles With Tofu

Soba noodle is the Japanese name for buckwheat noodles. Authentic soba noodles are made of 100 percent buckwheat and are gluten-free, but now most brands add a small amount of wheat. Soba noodles and wheat noodles contain the same quantity of protein, but the protein that soba noodles have is more bioavailable, which means the body can use it more effectively. (1) (2)Besides high-quality protein, it is rich in insoluble fiber, Vitamin B, and antioxidants like rutin, one of the most potent flavonoids with a cholesterol-lowering effect. Phytosterols, d-chiro-Inositol, and Myo-inositol are other components in soba noodles linked with healing chronic diseases like diabetes, heart diseases, inflammation, certain cancers, and mental health disorders. (3) (4)




Soba noodles have a nutty, earthy flavor and a little chewy texture. Soba noodles, wholly made up of buckwheat, are gluten-free. If you are looking for a gluten-free option, look for no wheat-added variety. Traditionally, it is boiled and served with dipping sauce. I am cooking it with lots of vegetables to give an extra nutritional punch. I am adding oil-free crispy tofu stripes that are easy to make and boost the taste and nutrition of the recipe. Feel free to add more veggies of your choice to make them delectable and suit your palate. This recipe is an easy way to treat my kids with lots n lots of vegetables. I often make it, especially for my little one, when she comes home after a tiring swim session. I highly recommend trying soba noodles at least once.


Cautions If you are allergic to Buckwheat, although it is rare to have one, you should avoid eating Soba noodles. (5) (6)


Serves- 4-5

Preparation Time- 20 mins

Cooking time- 25 mins

Total time- 45 mins


Ingredients

Soba noodles - 3 bundles (270 gm)

Green beans- 1 cup (cut in 2 inches strips)

Carrot- 2 medium ( cut in 2 inches strip)

Cabbage – 1 cup ( thinly sliced)

Red bell pepper- 1 cup (thinly sliced)

Green bell pepper- 1 cup (thinly sliced)

Onions – 1 medium (thinly sliced)

Garlic – Green onions ( finely chopped, separate white and green portions)

Tofu (Extra firm) - 4 oz (cut the block into five thin slices)

Scallions- 1 bunch (finely chopped, separate white and green portions)

White vinegar- 1 Tbsp

Low-sodium soy sauce – 2 Tbsp

Sesame oil/ peanut oil – 1 ½ Tbsp

Salt- as per taste

Black pepper – 5 -6 (ground)

Toasted sesame seeds- 1 Tbsp




Directions

1. Boil 1 ½ quart water in a pot. Add 1 tsp salt and 1 tsp oil.




2. Add noodles to the boiling water. Stir it occasionally to prevent them from sticking together. Mostly soba noodles get cooked in 4-5 mins. (Refer to package for exact cooking time)




3. Pour the noodles into a colander to drain out all the water. Rinse them under cold running water.



4. Heat a wok with medium-high heat. Add oil to it.

5. Add onions, garlic, and the white part of the scallion to it. Stir it occasionally for 3 mins. Add 1 tsp salt.



6. Add green beans. Stir it occasionally for 2 mins



7. Add carrots. Stir it occasionally for 2 mins



8. Add shredded cabbage. Stir it occasionally for 3 mins.



9. Add Soy sauce and vinegar, and black pepper. Please give it a nice stir.



10. Add bell peppers. Stir it for 2 mins.



11. Add boiled soba noodles. Give it a nice stir. Adjust the seasoning.



12. Add chopped scallions.

13. Pat dry tofu in between paper towels. Cut it vertically into five thin slices. Heat a nonstick pan at medium heat. Sear both sides for 2 mins each without adding any oil. Cool the tofu slices and chop them into thin strips.





14. Mix tofu slices in the noodles.

15. Garnish it with Toasted sesame seeds.



16. Enjoy


(Tip - Add little salt initially. After adding noodles, taste your noodles and then adjust the seasoning as soy sauce contains some salt.)


References:

  1. Nutritional properties of starch in buckwheat noodles - PubMed (nih.gov)

  2. Buckwheat noodles: processing and quality enhancement - PubMed (nih.gov)

  3. Buckwheat bioactive compounds, their derived phenolic metabolites and their health benefits - PubMed (nih.gov)

  4. Bioactive compounds in functional buckwheat food - ScienceDirect

  5. Buckwheat allergy: a potential problem in 21st century Britain - PubMed (nih.gov)

  6. Buckwheat allergy - PubMed (nih.gov)

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